Happy Birthday, Musica Ferrum!

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Independent music publisher Editions Musica Ferrum launched ten years ago, and as we celebrate the anniversary this week I am happy to share this interview which I recently conducted with EMF founder and owner Nikolas Sideris.

The interview covers the Musica Ferrum story so far, with many fascinating insights. The interview also appears as a YouTube video at the end of this post, following a transcript of the major points…

Continue reading Happy Birthday, Musica Ferrum!

Margaret Murray McLeod: An Appreciation

I was saddened to hear news of the recent passing of the beloved pianist, teacher, educator, writer, and composer MARGARET MURRAY McLEOD (1936-2021).

In this moving appreciation, guest writer MURRAY McLACHLAN pays tribute to one who made such a wonderful difference in the lives and music-making of many…


Margaret was an extraordinary, talented person in so many ways. She was driven by the desire to give. Her contributions to society, pupils, colleagues, organisations, and family are immense and serve as a model for all of us, even though there are few if any of us who could begin to match Margaret in terms of what she achieved.

She was an immensely talented individual, a beautiful person who touched so many of us through her tremendous warmth, loyalty, energy, and devotion. Her beauty is evident in many touching photographs from different periods of her life…. But the real beauty in Margaret was so much more than her physical attractiveness, considerable though that was.

She cared with beauty. Her pupils’ development mattered deeply to her. Margaret cared so much for Napier (where she was a remarkable head of keyboard), for ABRSM (for whom she did countless national and international tours as well as articles, presentations and books), for EPTA and EPTA Scotland in particular (regional organiser, EPTA UK Management Committee Member), for the Scottish Chamber Orchestra (for whom she played harpsichord and Piano), and for the Royal Academy of Music (where she graduated from after a hugely successful studentship in which she won the coveted Scott Huxley Prize for accompaniment).

She was a vibrant speaker. She wrote enthusiastic reviews and teaching notes. She was passionate about training new teachers. The burning desire she felt to help new teachers resulted in an extraordinary annual summer course at Napier which ran for many years, and which was hugely successful in helping to support and encourage new generations of musicians to become piano teachers. Margaret’s piano teachers’ course remains the flagship model of its kind, and it remains by far the most successful piano teaching course ever to have been held in the United Kingdom.

But all the above is but a superficial beginning… Margaret was so much more than that. She never retired; she was constantly working, supporting, encouraging, and motivating. Every phone conversation I had with her (and there were many) always included a new musical project for her, or me, or usually both of us, to get stuck in with.

She wrote a wonderful book on piano pedalling which was well received, and which really needs now to be reprinted. She planned a follow up book to this excellent first volume.

Margaret was also a highly accomplished composer in her own right. A number of her beautifully crafted miniatures are still available in print. Additionally, she made transcriptions, including a most exquisite one for clarinet and piano duo of John’s solo piano version of the ‘Three Interludes’ from his film score ‘Another Time, Another Place’. I was deeply honoured and privileged to perform Margaret’s transcription with the clarinettist and principal of RNCM, Professor Linda Merrick at a special John McLeod 80th birthday concert in 2014.

Margaret had a highly stimulating and extremely busy career. Her performances ranged from triumphant renderings of Bartók’s Third Concerto through world premieres of her husband’s works, duo sonata repertoire and harpsichord continuo work (as well as much else).

But in spite of such ‘perpetual motion’, she never failed to be anything other than a wonderful mother and grandmother, and an extraordinary wife! As partner to John she was, undeniably, superwoman. Her energetic fervour, loyalty, and passionate endeavour knew no bounds when it came to supporting John McLeod the composer. Not only did she perform her husband’s glorious music, but she also helped and assisted with the tiring tasks of administration, copying, proof-reading and so on. And she was far from inactive in terms of promoting John’s music: Immediately after her husband John’s Sixtieth birthday concert at Napier University in 1994 (an event which Margaret lovingly organised and masterminded) the composer Ronald Stevenson pulled me aside and said,

‘We should be deeply moved, touched and humbled by the huge love that Margaret has just shown to dear John. That is devotion. That is loyalty’.

Ronald Stevenson always had a soft spot in his heart for dear Margaret, just as I am sure everyone privileged enough to come into contact with her did too. When John phoned me on Monday with the sad news, of course tears immediately filled my eyes, along with deep concern for John himself, who has lost his devoted partner after over 60 years of blissful marriage. Indeed, they had only just celebrated their Diamond Wedding anniversary on 12 August in a hospital party at which Margaret showed extraordinary fortitude, positivity, and spirit.

But, as the grief continues, we should also feel a deep sense of gratitude for all that Margaret did. She was courageous beyond belief in the face of her final illness, over the past twelve months in particular, so it is a merciful blessing indeed that she is no longer suffering.

There remains a deep held conviction that Margaret is continuing to inspire us all by watching over what we do. In particular she will ensure that the world shows continued loyalty for John’s glorious music. As mentioned earlier, Margaret assisted so much in John’s artistic work, and John looked after Margaret too. In the final months, as throughout all their marriage, John was exceptionally caring and loving. It is comforting to know that she spent her final days in her beloved music room, surrounded by flowers with her Steinway grand and photos not only of her family but also including one of Emil Gilels, her special pianistic hero.

Margaret Murray McLeod
pianist, teacher, educator, writer, and composer
Born: Southend-on-Sea, 18th November 1936
Died: Edinburgh 26th September 2021


The Piano Teachers’ Course

ANDREW EALES in conversation with LUCINDA MACKWORTH-YOUNG and MASAYUKI TAYAMA of the PIANO TEACHERS’ COURSE UK


Currently in its 13th year, the Piano Teachers’ Course UK (PTC) is the longest-running course of its kind in this country, specifically designed for pianists and piano teachers who wish to enhance their professional teaching skills, come together for inspiration and become part of a motivated, supportive musical network.

Having previously visited several residential course weekends as an observer and guest tutor, I have been hugely impressed with the professionalism with which the one-year programme is run, and by the expertise and dedication that the PTC personnel offer.

I have also seen that the PTC shares very similar values to those that I espouse here on Pianodao. Those who have studied with me, who come to me for mentoring, or who simply enjoy reading my articles here will most likely feel very at home on the PTC course.

As the course continues to diversify its offer to include online access and an international reach, this seems a good time to catch up with the course’s founder and International Director, Lucinda Mackworth-Young, and UK Course Director Masayuki Tayama for a cup of tea and a chat on Zoom.

Continue reading The Piano Teachers’ Course

Iyad Sughayer in Conversation

Iyad Sughayer has been quietly establishing a reputation as one of our brightest upcoming pianists, appearing as soloist with the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, European Union Chamber Orchestra and the Cairo and Amman Symphony Orchestras, as well as giving solo performances in such prestigious venues as London’s Wigmore Hall and King’s Place, Manchester’s Bridgewater Hall and the Steinway-Haus in Hamburg.

Now he has released his debut recording on the BIS label. A brilliantly conceived and executed disc of solo piano works by Aram Khachaturian (1903-78), the recording is certainly a stunning showcase for the brilliant talents of this young player, who delivers performances of the utmost musical conviction and power.

I was delighted to more recently catch up with him at the Chetham’s Summer School for Pianists, since which I have now had a chance to interview him in more depth for the site…

Continue reading Iyad Sughayer in Conversation

A Composer in Conversation

Rami Bar-Niv will be known to some readers as an acclaimed concert pianist, recording artist, renowned pedagogue and author of the outstanding book, The Art of Piano Fingering (which I have reviewed here).

Before discovering any of this, I first encountered the genial musician when running an online group for composers; Rami became an active contributor, and I was immediately struck by the quality of his original music in an engaging contemporary classical style.

It is a privilege to have this opportunity to chat with Rami about his composing career, and there are many insights here which Pianodao readers will undoubtedly find interesting and helpful…

Continue reading A Composer in Conversation

Samantha Coates in Conversation

Exclusive interview with best-selling author Samantha Coates

Sydney-based music teacher and author Samantha Coates dazzled at this year’s Music Education Expo event, with a presentation brimming with energy and enthusiasm.

It was a pleasure to catch up with her afterwards to talk about her publications. In a warm, wide-ranging conversation, we discussed the importance of literacy, music theory and sight-reading, as well as Samantha’s recently developed passion for rote teaching.

But first I wanted to know more about Samantha’s back story …

Continue reading Samantha Coates in Conversation

Martin Roscoe’s Dohnányi Odyssey

photo: Eric Richmond

Exclusive Interview with concert pianist Martin Roscoe

As Hyperion Records release the fourth and final disc in Martin Roscoe’s survey of the solo piano music of Ernő Dohnányi it was a delight to have the chance to ask Martin about his Dohnányi odyssey, which has taken so much of his time over recent years.


I was keen to know more about how this extraordinary project came about, and the impact it has made on pianist and audiences alike …

Continue reading Martin Roscoe’s Dohnányi Odyssey

Marcel Zidani: Hey Presto!

Interview with Marcel Zidani, author of Hey Presto.

Marcel Zidani’s Hey Presto! is billed as a “first piano lessons” book for older beginners aged 11 and upwards. The subtitle – pedal your way to piano perfection– reveals something of the book’s unique approach, and like many I was intrigued when it first appeared a couple of summers ago.

Reviewing Hey Presto! at the time, I found much to love about Marcel’s method and music, while noting a few minor concerns. Since then, Marcel has responded to the feedback received from teachers and is now back with a thorough reworking of the concept and a brand-new edition of Hey Presto!

So what better time to catch up with Marcel for a chat, find out what motivates Hey Presto! and ask how he has improved on the original publication…

Continue reading Marcel Zidani: Hey Presto!

Lipatti: Remembering a Legend

Products featured on Pianodao are selected for review by Andrew Eales.
When you purchase using the site’s retail links, Pianodao may earn a small commission without affecting the price you pay.


“Music is a serious matter”
Dinu Lipatti (1917-1950)

Dinu Lipatti was born in Bucharest on 19th March 1917. His life and career shone with a brightness that helped illuminate the piano’s “golden age”, leaving an indelible hue on our cultural heritage. That blazing light was tragically extinguished on 2nd December 1950, when Lipatti died of Hodgkin’s Disease.

But Lipatti’s legacy lives on, and such was the precision, luminosity and spirituality of his playing that, these many decades later, many of his recordings (mostly from the 1940s) are still regarded as milestones in the history of music…

Continue reading Lipatti: Remembering a Legend