Mindfulness in Music

Book Review

Once upon a time, books were something very special – not mere repositories of bullet-pointed knowledge, but containers of true magic whose words could unfetter the imagination and conjure into being a genuine sense of wonder.

It seems to me that as the internet age comes to maturity there has been a concurrent if unexpected reappraisal and renewed appreciation of the tactile immersion made possible by a traditional, high-quality physical book.

Riding the crest of an exciting wave of publications crafted to the highest standard, and with a deliberate nod towards the publishing values of an earlier generation, comes a small but highly significant volume by Mark Tanner entitled Mindfulness in Music, published by Leaping Hare Press as an imprint within their ongoing series of mindfulness-related books.

The book is an inspirational delight from cover to cover (and including the covers themselves!) and I highly commend it to Pianodao readers as the “must-read” book of the season…

Continue reading Mindfulness in Music

Your Story: Garreth Brooke

photo copyright Lana Yanovska, used with permission.

Garreth was born in Hereford, UK, moved to Wales as a child, before going on to study music at the University of Oxford. He now teaches piano to a full studio of international students in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, and releases original music for solo piano on 1631 Recordings using the pen-name Garreth Broke. His writing about suicide prevention has been published on Huffington Post UK.

Here’s his story …

Continue reading Your Story: Garreth Brooke

Your Story: Rachel Rowles

I live in Devon and teach piano alongside a career in the NHS. I am currently a student on the Piano Teachers’ Course UK, so have been reflecting a lot on my piano journey this far, and on what comes next! Here’s my story…

Continue reading Your Story: Rachel Rowles

Making Music Accessible

… especially to those with dyslexia and other learning difficulties

Guest post by Karen Marshall

I have been teaching students with specific learning difficulties (especially dyslexia) for twenty years now.  It’s been a real journey which has been packed with lots of learning, creativity, patience, joy, challenge but most of all reward.

Reward in being able to share in music making with students who can find music learning has challenges.

It is important to remember that no two students are the same – and especially no two dyslexic or students with special needs. The solutions may need adapting for individual students, or strategies specially selected for them. And also remember that some students with learning difficulties don’t have any problems with music learning at all. One size does not fit all!

The topic is vast. In this post I identify four of the main Guiding Principles for working with students with special needs.

These principles work well across all my teaching – good teaching is, I believe, good teaching! And I am sure many teachers reading this post will do much of what I describe anyway.

Continue reading Making Music Accessible

Piano Blogs: a new community

I am pleased to announce a new Facebook community group for those who read and write blogs about the piano: Piano Blogs!

The aim of the group is to provide a dedicated space for pianists and writers to share and encourage one another, as well as a focal point where bloggers can share our latest posts.

This is important, because many online communities don’t appreciate bloggers who link to their sites, regarding the free sharing of articles as a form of self-promotion. For example, on Reddit not all subreddit areas welcome blog links, while forums such as Piano World can react with hostility towards bloggers who share their posts. Similarly, some Facebook piano groups prefer to limit or restrict the sharing of online writing.

And that’s why those who READ blogs will enjoy the Piano Blogs group as much as those who write them! I believe that the group can offer a unique space online where interaction between readers, writers and pianists can flourish.

Personally, having received so much encouragement, and from so many, I hope Piano Blogs can now support other writers and those interested in taking up blogging, while providing ongoing stimulus to those of us already active creating piano related content online.

Continue reading Piano Blogs: a new community