Alan Bullard’s Preludes

Sheet Music Review

Alan Bullard will be known to many readers for his many contributions to popular educational series such as Piano Time from OUP and Piano Star from ABRSM. His Joining the Dots series of sight reading books for ABRSM and the excellent adult piano method series Pianoworks, co-written with his wife Janet, have also become well known favourites.

Alan’s latest publication is brought to us by Colne Edition, distributed by Spartan Press, and is entitled Twelve or Thirteen Preludes for Solo Piano.

Continue reading Alan Bullard’s Preludes

Does music grow on the family tree?

Guest Post by Simon Reich

I would imagine, many creative and serious musicians, would love their children to follow in the same footsteps? Well interestingly enough, it doesn’t always turn out that way.

Take my own four children for example…

Continue reading Does music grow on the family tree?

Ask ABRSM

I’m delighted to let you know that Pianodao will feature an exclusive interview with ABRSM Chief Executive Michael Elliott next month.

Readers are invited to submit questions here.
Simply add yours as a comment below this blog post, and I will try to include it in the interview.

The goal of the interview is to get behind the scenes, perhaps bust a few myths, and give Michael a chance to talk about the direction ABRSM are headed, answering any questions or concerns teachers and candidates may have.

ABRSM and Pianodao will both be sharing this blog post via our respective social media channels, and hope to crowd-source as many interesting questions as possible. Questions submitted elsewhere on social media might get missed however, so please be sure to post your question in the comments here.

On your marks, get set ….  ASK!

Closing date: Monday 3rd April.

[NB if you haven’t commented here before, your first comment is send for approval before it appears in public, but I get an instant notification and will approve quickly.]

Interview with “Totally Mad” composer Chris Dann

“100 Totally Mad Really Easy Piano Songs for Kids” is an exciting collection of songs written especially for the young pianist. Wacky and original material makes learning fun, while progressively building skills in piano technique and music reading, providing a wide range of content suitable for use from the first lesson up until around Grade 1.

The use of songs – and hence singing – makes this an ideal resource for helping children developing their musicianship and aural engagement. And the quirky sense of humour that pervades the songs is sure to have huge appeal, hooking children into a lifetime of musical enjoyment.

It is without doubt one of the most innovative and imaginative alternatives to the conventional Tutor Book approach that I’ve come across. So it was a delight to catch up with the book’s author/composer, Chris Dann, and ask him all about the book – and the other resources he has produced.

But first, I wanted to find about more about Chris’s own musical journey…

Continue reading Interview with “Totally Mad” composer Chris Dann

Lipatti: Remembering a Legend

Book Review

“Music is a serious matter”
Dinu Lipatti (1917-1950)

Dinu Lipatti was born in Bucharest on 19th March 1917, a hundred years ago this week. His life and career shone with a brightness that helped illuminate the piano’s “golden age”, leaving an indelible hue on our cultural heritage. That blazing light was tragically extinguished on 2nd December 1950, when Lipatti died of Hodgkin’s Disease.

But Lipatti’s legacy lives on, and such was the precision, luminosity and spirituality of his playing that, these many decades later, many of his recordings (mostly from the 1940s) are still regarded as milestones in the history of music.

Continue reading Lipatti: Remembering a Legend

The Pianist’s Self-Compassion

The Pianist’s Reflections

Guest post by Frances Wilson

The life of the pianist is, by necessity, solitary (and I have written before about The Pianist’s Solitude). For many of us, the solitude is not an issue: we crave a sense of apartness to enable us to do our work and to create special connections with audiences when we perform, and we need quietude to allow time for self-reflection and evaluation.

The sequestered nature of the pianist’s life also calls for great self-reliance: we must  be self-starting, motivated, driven and focused to ensure our work (practising and preparation) is done each day. Most of us draw pleasure and satisfaction from knowing our work is done and done well, but without other colleagues and musical companions to interact with, it is easy for self-doubt to creep in, for us to question our role or our value, to ask “am I good enough?”. Continue reading The Pianist’s Self-Compassion