100 Inspiring Ideas!

Book Review

The work of the independent piano teacher can be as varied as it is rewarding, and this throws up innumerable challenges on a regular basis.

Every student is unique, and each lesson different from the previous or next one. Holistic teaching requires not only a deep subject knowledge combined with pedagogic expertise, but also psychological insight, access to multiple teaching strategies and resources, tactful diplomacy and administrative efficiency.

It’s little wonder that many piano teachers struggle to be equally adroit in all these areas, or to have well-honed skill-sets to meet all these varied demands. And while answers to many of the questions we face – and situations which arise – are probably to be found in our previous knowledge, experience and common sense, it is nevertheless a huge asset to go through each day prepared for what may arise, and thoughtful of the ways in which we can improve as well-rounded teachers.

Help is at hand in a recent book written by Penny Stirling and Karen Marshall, and published by Collins Music.

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Multi-Sensory Music Teaching

Guest post by Karen Marshall

Multi-sensory music teaching is just what it sounds like: using all the senses to teach and learn music. The main senses employed are visual (seeing), auditory (hearing) and kinesthetic (doing).

I would also add in reading and writing (text) as the literate nature of our world shows that many people find this useful, even those with dyslexia.

Multi-sensory music teaching can be seen in some of the most respected approaches to such work throughout the world including those of Dalcroze, Kodály, Suzuki and Orff. It can benefit all learners, including those with specific learning difficulties like dyslexia. In her key book Instrumental Music for Dyslexics: A Teaching Handbook (Whurr, 2002), Sheila Oglethorpe emphasizes this, encouraging people

“to employ as many of the child’s senses as possible in the hope that the stronger senses will compensate for the weaker ones”.

However, multi-sensory teaching shouldn’t be seen as a method to just use with students who have special needs – it has huge benefits for all…

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A Free Certificate of Merit

With the generous permission of Collins Music and author/composers Karen Marshall and Heather Hammond, the Pianodao site has for some time been a host to the many creative and useful FREE resources that accompany the excellent Get Set! Piano series of tutor books.

And these have proved super-popular with both teachers and students!

So it’s a pleasure to let you know that there is a new addition to the growing resource-bank available for download here.

This certificate of merit is, according to Karen,

“… a general certificate of merit for the series which teachers can use as they please.  For some children there are some big achievements before they finish the book that need to be recognised.  The design is pretty beautiful and if put on card I think will be really special for children.”

And Karen is at pains to mention that the certificate would be useful regardless of whether you happen to use the Get Set! Piano series or not:

“It also could be used what ever method is being used – as Get Set! is a word that can simply be a general term linked with piano learning.”

So what are you waiting for? Here is the FREE download for you to save and print off:

Get Set certificate Piano Certificate of merit

Once again, it’s a pleasure to be able to share these resources on this site, and do check out the whole collection of them here!

Working Positively with Parents

Guest Post by Karen Marshall

Pushy Parent Syndrome

Is this something you are experiencing in your studio?

I recently attended a teacher meeting where a teacher was relaying her recent experiences with a very difficult parent of a young 6-year-old student. As I pondered the topic I realised that ‘pushy parent syndrome’, luckily, has not been something that I’ve recently encountered as regularly as in my young teaching years.

I felt it may be helpful to share some practices I’ve developed which have certainly made my teaching life far easier.

My approach is partly a conflict resolution one.  I would add its a “work in progress” – I would never claim to have all the answers and I’m still learning constantly after over 25 years of piano teaching!

I say conflict resolution because a relationship between a teacher and parent has potential for conflict, simply because the parent purchases the lessons and the child receives them. The relationship is a triangle – if anyone has ever had a dotted line with two managers you will know first-hand the problems that can cause.

  • The parent’s needs may be different to the child’s – conflict.
  • The parent’s expectations may be different to the abilities of the child – conflict.

Before you know it, you are jam-sandwiched between the child and the parent. So, what are the practical things I try to employ to make things easier and – most importantly – best for the student whilst maintaining good professional practices?

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LCM Syllabus 2018: The Big Review

Sheet Music Review  by Karen Marshall

November has seen the London College of Music present their new piano syllabus.

Due to staff changes the last time the syllabus was changed was back in 2013. So I was very excited to see what LCM were offering – especially as many of my colleagues Andrew Eales, David Barton, Francis Wilson and Melanie Spanswick have consulted on the main albums.

As a teacher who actively uses LCM, along with Trinity and ABRSM, Andrew asked me to write the review (to maintain impartiality).

As my first full syllabus review on Pianodao, I have worked really hard to get a broad collection of voices – many thanks to my piano teaching colleagues who have helped me shape this review.

I must say that the overall impression is that this is a job very well done by LCM, and a big step up from previously piano syllabi in terms of pedagogical content, variety of repertoire, quality of editing and presentation of the publications. Huge congratulations to William Alexander, David Duncan and the rest of the team at LCM for this achievement.

Now here’s my review, and in true Pianodao style, it is equally as detailed as Andrew’s! I really hope it proves helpful to teachers and pupils.

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